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Chinese Surveillance, Facebook Tracking, and More Security News This Week 3-D printed rifles, Iran missile hacking, and more of the week’s top security news. https://ift.tt/2Na1LZJ

February 16, 2019

from Pradodesign Chinese Surveillance, Facebook Tracking, and More Security News This Week 3-D printed rifles, Iran missile hacking, and more of the week’s top security news. https://ift.tt/2Na1LZJ http://bit.ly/1P9I4xH
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The Pentagon Needs to Woo AI Experts Away From Big Tech Opinion: Without more DOD investment, there just aren’t enough incentives to lure talent away from high-paying jobs with great benefits into a life of public service. https://ift.tt/2STUNx7

February 16, 2019

from Pradodesign The Pentagon Needs to Woo AI Experts Away From Big Tech Opinion: Without more DOD investment, there just aren’t enough incentives to lure talent away from high-paying jobs with great benefits into a life of public service. https://ift.tt/2STUNx7 http://bit.ly/1P9I4xH
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Sci-Fi Author Robert Heinlein Was Basically MacGyver Gregory Benford’s new book portrays the writer as a man of action and improvised traps. https://ift.tt/2Nb6Pgy

February 16, 2019

from Pradodesign Sci-Fi Author Robert Heinlein Was Basically MacGyver Gregory Benford’s new book portrays the writer as a man of action and improvised traps. https://ift.tt/2Nb6Pgy http://bit.ly/1P9I4xH
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Startups Weekly: Is Y Combinator’s latest cohort too big? Greetings from Chittorgarh, one of my stops on a two-week excursion through Goa and Rajasthan, India. I’ve been a little too busy exploring, photographing cows and monkeys and eating a lot of delicious food to keep up with *all* the tech news, but I’ve still got the highlights. For starters, if you haven’t heard yet, TechCrunch launched Extra Crunch, a paid premium subscription offering full of amazing content. As part of Extra Crunch, we’ll be doing deep dives on select businesses, beginning with Patreon. Read Patreon’s founding story here and learn how two college roommates built the world’s leading creator platform. Plus, we’ve got insights on Patreon’s product, business strategy, competitors and more. Sign up for Extra Crunch membership here. On to other news… Y Combinator’s latest batch of startups is huge So huge the Silicon Valley accelerator had to move locations and set up two stages at its upcoming demo days (March 18-19) to accommodate the more than 200 startups ready to pitch investors (who will have to hop between stages at the event). There will also be a virtual demo day live-streamed for some investors to watch “because there are so few seats.” Here’s what I’m wondering… At what point is a YC cohort too big? If investors aren’t even able to view all the companies at Demo Day, what exactly is the point? Send me your thoughts. Deal of the week Another week, another SoftBank deal. The Vision Fund’s latest bet is autonomous delivery. The Japanese telecom giant has invested $940 million in Nuro, the developer of a custom unmanned vehicle designed for last-mile delivery of local goods and services. The startup, also backed by Greylock and Gaorong Capital, will use the cash to expand its delivery service, add new partners, hire employees and scale up its fleet of self-driving bots. And while we’re on the subject of autonomous, TuSimple, a self-driving truck startup, has raised a $95 million Series D at a unicorn valuation. Mamoon Hamid and Ilya Fushman The future of KPCB TechCrunch’s Connie Loizos spoke with Mamoon Hamid and Ilya Fushman, who joined Kleiner Perkins from Social Capital and Index Ventures, respectively. The pair talked about Kleiner Perkins, touching on people who’ve left the firm, how its decision-making process now works, why there are no senior women in its ranks and what they make of SoftBank’s Vision Fund. Here’s your weekly reminder to send me tips, suggestions and more to kate.clark@techcrunch.com or @KateClarkTweets. Facebook almost bought Unity Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg considered a multi-billion-dollar purchase of Unity, a game development platform. This is according to a new book coming out next week, “The History of the Future,” by Blake Harris, which digs deep into the founding story of Oculus and the drama surrounding the Facebook acquisition, subsequent lawsuits and personal politics of founder Palmer Luckey. Here’s more on the acquisition-that-could-have-been from TechCrunch’s Lucas Matney. Venture capital funds Indonesia-focused Intudo Ventures raised a new $50 million fund this week to invest in the world’s fourth most populated country; InReach Ventures, the “AI-powered” European VC, closed a new €53 million early-stage vehicle; and btov Partners closed an €80 million fund aimed at industrial tech startups. Xiaomi-backed electric toothbrush startup Soocas raises $30M Startup cash Jobvite raises $200M+ and acquires three recruitment startups to expand its platform play Opendoor files to raise another $200M DriveNets emerges from stealth with $110M for its cloud-based alternative to network routers Figma gets $40M Series C to put design tools in the cloud Xiaomi-backed electric toothbrush Soocas raises $30 million Series C Malt raises $28.6 million for its freelancer platform Elevate Security announces $8M Series A to alter employee security behavior Massless raises $2M to build an Apple Pencil for virtual reality Subscription scooters Just when you thought the scooter boom and the subscription-boom wouldn’t intersect, Grover arrived to prove you wrong. The startup is launching an e-scooter monthly subscription service in Germany. Their big idea is that instead of purchasing an e-scooter outright, GroverGo customers can enjoy unlimited e-scooter rides without the upfront costs or commitment of owning an e-scooter. Listen to me talk If you enjoy this newsletter, be sure to check out TechCrunch’s venture-focused podcast, Equity. In this week’s episode, available here, Crunchbase News editor-in-chief Alex Wilhelm and General Catalyst’s Niko Bonatsos chat startups. Want more TechCrunch newsletters? Sign up here. https://tcrn.ch/2IkWYWy

February 16, 2019

from Pradodesign Startups Weekly: Is Y Combinator’s latest cohort too big?

Greetings from Chittorgarh, one of my stops on a two-week excursion through Goa and Rajasthan, India. I’ve been a little too busy exploring, photographing cows and monkeys and eating a lot of delicious food to keep up with *all* the tech news, but I’ve still got the highlights.

For starters, if you haven’t heard yet, TechCrunch launched Extra Crunch, a paid premium subscription offering full of amazing content. As part of Extra Crunch, we’ll be doing deep dives on select businesses, beginning with Patreon. Read Patreon’s founding story here and learn how two college roommates built the world’s leading creator platform. Plus, we’ve got insights on Patreon’s product, business strategy, competitors and more.

Sign up for Extra Crunch membership here.

On to other news…

Y Combinator’s latest batch of startups is huge

So huge the Silicon Valley accelerator had to move locations and set up two stages at its upcoming demo days (March 18-19) to accommodate the more than 200 startups ready to pitch investors (who will have to hop between stages at the event). There will also be a virtual demo day live-streamed for some investors to watch “because there are so few seats.” Here’s what I’m wondering… At what point is a YC cohort too big? If investors aren’t even able to view all the companies at Demo Day, what exactly is the point? Send me your thoughts.

Deal of the week

Another week, another SoftBank deal. The Vision Fund’s latest bet is autonomous delivery. The Japanese telecom giant has invested $940 million in Nuro, the developer of a custom unmanned vehicle designed for last-mile delivery of local goods and services. The startup, also backed by Greylock and Gaorong Capital, will use the cash to expand its delivery service, add new partners, hire employees and scale up its fleet of self-driving bots. And while we’re on the subject of autonomous, TuSimple, a self-driving truck startup, has raised a $95 million Series D at a unicorn valuation.

Mamoon Hamid and Ilya Fushman

The future of KPCB

TechCrunch’s Connie Loizos spoke with Mamoon Hamid and Ilya Fushman, who joined Kleiner Perkins from Social Capital and Index Ventures, respectively. The pair talked about Kleiner Perkins, touching on people who’ve left the firm, how its decision-making process now works, why there are no senior women in its ranks and what they make of SoftBank’s Vision Fund.

Here’s your weekly reminder to send me tips, suggestions and more to kate.clark@techcrunch.com or @KateClarkTweets.

Facebook almost bought Unity

Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg considered a multi-billion-dollar purchase of Unity, a game development platform. This is according to a new book coming out next week, “The History of the Future,” by Blake Harris, which digs deep into the founding story of Oculus and the drama surrounding the Facebook acquisition, subsequent lawsuits and personal politics of founder Palmer Luckey. Here’s more on the acquisition-that-could-have-been from TechCrunch’s Lucas Matney.

Venture capital funds

Indonesia-focused Intudo Ventures raised a new $50 million fund this week to invest in the world’s fourth most populated country; InReach Ventures, the “AI-powered” European VC, closed a new €53 million early-stage vehicle; and btov Partners closed an €80 million fund aimed at industrial tech startups.

Xiaomi-backed electric toothbrush startup Soocas raises $30M

Startup cash

Jobvite raises $200M+ and acquires three recruitment startups to expand its platform play
Opendoor files to raise another $200M
DriveNets emerges from stealth with $110M for its cloud-based alternative to network routers
Figma gets $40M Series C to put design tools in the cloud
Xiaomi-backed electric toothbrush Soocas raises $30 million Series C
Malt raises $28.6 million for its freelancer platform
Elevate Security announces $8M Series A to alter employee security behavior
Massless raises $2M to build an Apple Pencil for virtual reality

Subscription scooters

Just when you thought the scooter boom and the subscription-boom wouldn’t intersect, Grover arrived to prove you wrong. The startup is launching an e-scooter monthly subscription service in Germany. Their big idea is that instead of purchasing an e-scooter outright, GroverGo customers can enjoy unlimited e-scooter rides without the upfront costs or commitment of owning an e-scooter.

Listen to me talk

If you enjoy this newsletter, be sure to check out TechCrunch’s venture-focused podcast, Equity. In this week’s episode, available here, Crunchbase News editor-in-chief Alex Wilhelm and General Catalyst’s Niko Bonatsos chat startups.

Want more TechCrunch newsletters? Sign up here.

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Space Photos of the Week: The Trail of Opportunity and More As hard as it is to say goodbye to our favorite little rover, the mission had a hell of a run on Mars. https://ift.tt/2NaXLbl

February 16, 2019

from Pradodesign Space Photos of the Week: The Trail of Opportunity and More As hard as it is to say goodbye to our favorite little rover, the mission had a hell of a run on Mars. https://ift.tt/2NaXLbl http://bit.ly/1P9I4xH
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Yuhantechnos Headquarter | MMKM associates Designed by MMKM associates, In April 2015, Yuhantechnos Headquarter Co., Ltd. a middle-sized company providing IT solutions of logistics distribution has commissioned a new head office building project. To meet the client, when I visited the office located in an apartment-type factory in Mullae-dong, I found the typical problem of the apartment-type factory that as the width and depth of building is long and the ceiling height is low, the working environment of workers in the center of business space is becoming poor. Photography: Hanul Lee The site of the new building is located in the north-east corner of a crossroad, D17-7, Magok district, Gangseo-gu, Seoul, looking toward south and west which is disadvantageous location condition as an office. In addition, as it is close to relatively big scaled sites, it seems that the building may look small. Despite that, the neighboring land condition that is completely empty without other buildings enables the architect to imagine freely. Photography: Hanul Lee To design the space with dignity for the Headquarter. a building of the growing middle-sized company, I divided the office area and service area and connected them by an atrium of the first floor and second floor and a courtyard of the third floor and fourth floor. By connecting the bridge outside of the atrium on the second floor and over the courtyard on the fourth floor, I provided the outside resting space on each floor. In addition, I made workers feel the sufficient openness in any space of office area by reducing the depth of the space and raising the height of the ceiling and making the inside space facing the atrium and courtyard. Plan 3 To prevent the strong sunlight in the afternoon from the south-west, I arranged a series of long hexagonal aluminum sheets toward south-west corner correctly and connected the other series of glasses among them, and the glass part of the west façade faces north-west and that of the south façade faces south-east. As a result, looking at the building from the south-west corner, the building becomes origami shape that west façade and south façade are correctly symmetric. The image created by the appearance of the building is changing according to the view, time and climate condition. The building appearance with looking-folded origami shape produces a very changeable image according to the position of a viewer. In addition, aluminum sheet and glasses encounter the harmony of sun and sky which doubles the change. As a result, the shape of stationary building produces new images continuously according to the situation. Photography: Hanul Lee The contemporary society enabled interactive communication that anyone can produce and consume images easily through online media. The images produced through this process are reproduced, consumed and amplified continuously which finally create the meaning and value beyond the text. If the output of architectural work basically producing the physical object can produce different images according to environment and situation, the anonymous individual who consumes these images can secure different open sources for reproduction. And then we can expect the phenomena that images can be amplified through the process of consumption and reproduction on the medium and generate different meaning and value. Photography: Hanul Lee Eventually, images in contemporary architecture, especially the images created by the façade are open sources that anonymous publics can make interactive communication, which can function as public goods. Thus, the building becomes to secure the identity from the public and the public can enjoy the building as consumer and producer of the image. Photography: Hanul Lee Project Info: Architects: MMKM associates Location: 1 Magok-dong, Gangseo-gu, Seoul, South Korea Architect in Charge: Seohong Min Design Team: Arnold Ghil Area: 2941.97 m2 Project Year: 2017 Photographs: Hanul Lee Manufacturers: Hanglass Project Name: Yuhantechnos Headquarter The post Yuhantechnos Headquarter | MMKM associates appeared first on Arch2O.com. http://bit.ly/2SCyb50

February 16, 2019

from Pradodesign Yuhantechnos Headquarter | MMKM associates

Designed by MMKM associates, In April 2015, Yuhantechnos Headquarter Co., Ltd. a middle-sized company providing IT solutions of logistics distribution has commissioned a new head office building project. To meet the client, when I visited the office located in an apartment-type factory in Mullae-dong, I found the typical problem of the apartment-type factory that as the width and depth of building is long and the ceiling height is low, the working environment of workers in the center of business space is becoming poor.

Photography: Hanul Lee

The site of the new building is located in the north-east corner of a crossroad, D17-7, Magok district, Gangseo-gu, Seoul, looking toward south and west which is disadvantageous location condition as an office. In addition, as it is close to relatively big scaled sites, it seems that the building may look small. Despite that, the neighboring land condition that is completely empty without other buildings enables the architect to imagine freely.

Photography: Hanul Lee

To design the space with dignity for the Headquarter. a building of the growing middle-sized company, I divided the office area and service area and connected them by an atrium of the first floor and second floor and a courtyard of the third floor and fourth floor. By connecting the bridge outside of the atrium on the second floor and over the courtyard on the fourth floor, I provided the outside resting space on each floor. In addition, I made workers feel the sufficient openness in any space of office area by reducing the depth of the space and raising the height of the ceiling and making the inside space facing the atrium and courtyard.

Plan 3

To prevent the strong sunlight in the afternoon from the south-west, I arranged a series of long hexagonal aluminum sheets toward south-west corner correctly and connected the other series of glasses among them, and the glass part of the west façade faces north-west and that of the south façade faces south-east. As a result, looking at the building from the south-west corner, the building becomes origami shape that west façade and south façade are correctly symmetric.
The image created by the appearance of the building is changing according to the view, time and climate condition. The building appearance with looking-folded origami shape produces a very changeable image according to the position of a viewer. In addition, aluminum sheet and glasses encounter the harmony of sun and sky which doubles the change. As a result, the shape of stationary building produces new images continuously according to the situation.

Photography: Hanul Lee

The contemporary society enabled interactive communication that anyone can produce and consume images easily through online media. The images produced through this process are reproduced, consumed and amplified continuously which finally create the meaning and value beyond the text. If the output of architectural work basically producing the physical object can produce different images according to environment and situation, the anonymous individual who consumes these images can secure different open sources for reproduction. And then we can expect the phenomena that images can be amplified through the process of consumption and reproduction on the medium and generate different meaning and value.

Photography: Hanul Lee

Eventually, images in contemporary architecture, especially the images created by the façade are open sources that anonymous publics can make interactive communication, which can function as public goods. Thus, the building becomes to secure the identity from the public and the public can enjoy the building as consumer and producer of the image.

Photography: Hanul Lee

Project Info:
Architects: MMKM associates
Location: 1 Magok-dong, Gangseo-gu, Seoul, South Korea
Architect in Charge: Seohong Min
Design Team: Arnold Ghil
Area: 2941.97 m2
Project Year: 2017
Photographs: Hanul Lee
Manufacturers: Hanglass
Project Name: Yuhantechnos Headquarter

The post Yuhantechnos Headquarter | MMKM associates appeared first on Arch2O.com.

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28 Best President’s Day Sales on Laptops, TVs, Gear (2019) We found the best tech bargains for the long holiday weekend from Beats, Dyson, and more. https://ift.tt/2SWgTPD

February 16, 2019

from Pradodesign 28 Best President’s Day Sales on Laptops, TVs, Gear (2019) We found the best tech bargains for the long holiday weekend from Beats, Dyson, and more. https://ift.tt/2SWgTPD http://bit.ly/1P9I4xH
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The Soothing Promise of Our Own Artisanal Internet As unease with Big Tech grows, some prescribe a slower, less viral online existence. “Eat independent sites, mostly not Facebook.” https://ift.tt/2Nb0zVK

February 16, 2019

from Pradodesign The Soothing Promise of Our Own Artisanal Internet As unease with Big Tech grows, some prescribe a slower, less viral online existence. “Eat independent sites, mostly not Facebook.” https://ift.tt/2Nb0zVK http://bit.ly/1P9I4xH
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Museum of the Second World War | Studio Architektoniczne Kwadrat Designed by Studio Architektoniczne Kwadrat, The Museum of the Second World War is built on a lot at Władysław Bartoszewski Square near the center of the city. It is located in a symbolic architectural space, which is also a space of memory, 200 meters from the historic Polish Post Office in Gdańsk and 3 kilometers across the water from Westerplatte Peninsula, both of which were attacked in September 1939. Photography: Pawel Paniczko The 1,700-square-metre lot set aside for the museum touches the Radunia Canal to the west, while its south side opens onto a wide panorama of the Motława River. Today, these are the outskirts of Old Gdańskbut, soon, it will be the core of the modern section of the city that will replace its shipyard. Jurors of the competition for the museum’s architectural plan have described it as “a new symbol of Gdańsk”, “a new icon” and a “sculptural design”. Daniel Libeskind, the jury’s chairman and one of the world’s best-known architects, designer of the Jewish Museum Berlin, justified the selection of the project as “Using the language of architecture, the selected project narrates the tragedy of the past, the vitality of the present, and opens the horizons of the future. The rising, dynamic form symbolizes the museum below while giving a panoramic and spectacular orientation to the historic city and its future. Echoing the iconic skyline of Gdańsk, with its shipyard cranes and church towers, the building ties together traditional urban spaces, scales, materials, and colors of the city with a 21st-century museum”. Photography: Pawel Paniczko Its authors, Kwadrat studio, have called their project a silent design, intended to evoke powerful emotions and deep reflection. The museum’s spatial division into three areas symbolizes the relationships between the wartime past, the present, and the future: the past is hidden on the building’s underground levels, the present appears in the open space around the building and the future is expressed by its rising protrusion, which includes a viewing platform. The building has about 23,000 square meters of floor area, of which the space reserved for the permanent exhibition covers around 5,000 square meters. The exhibition uses the most modern methods to present the Second World War from the perspective of big-power politics but, primarily, through the fates of ordinary people. It is not limited to the experiences of Poles, but recount those of other nations. Apart from the main exhibition space, 1,000 square meters are devoted to temporary shows. The museum’s mission is also to serve as a center of education, culture, and research. Photography: Pawel Paniczko “Entering the Museum of The World War II competition in Gdansk we were fully aware of the problems that may occur during the design process as well as its interaction with the environment and very complicated functionality. To fit in the historic part of the city, and creating a form that may become its icon at the same time, we had to make a compromise between its form and monumentality, being careful with its impudence and aggressiveness. We wanted the architecture to be a delicate suggestion rather than strong quotation for the World War II tragedy. That is how the idea of dynamic, expressive form had been brought to live, tearing apart the symbolic and dramatic shell covering the world, created by the war. The design of the form is to be undefined by one literal meaning. It may be discovered in many ways by each and every individual viewer. Photography: Pawel Paniczko Following the design process, we have agreed to leave most of the site as an open public space, so we moved some part of an exhibition underground. Entering the subterranean levels is to be a mood-setting process. Starting from being unconcern and full of everyday thoughts, to be hanged in the balance and clear-minded, to finally fell the horror, frightens and even pain by a strong relationship with the exhibition. The underground part of the museum is a path through a hell of war, a time travel experience. The “back to reality” begins with the ground level and the public space surrounding the museum, the place to think, to gather the experience from the underground. But that’s not the end, the past is a creator of the future, so as the viewer climbs the tower to the very top, he sees hope and freedom, he sees an old and young town of Gdansk. He sees it having thoughts of the past he had just experienced.” Plan -9.25 Project Info: Architects: Studio Architektoniczne Kwadrat Location: Plac Władysława Bartoszewskiego 1, 80-862 Gdańsk, Poland Architects in Charge: Jacek Droszcz, Bazyli Domsta, Andrzej Kwieciński, Zbigniew Kowalewski Area: 57386.0 m2 Project Year: 2017 Photographs: Pawel Paniczko Manufacturers: Saint Gobain, Peri Project Name: Museum of the Second World War The post Museum of the Second World War | Studio Architektoniczne Kwadrat appeared first on Arch2O.com. http://bit.ly/2EdfdZY

February 16, 2019

from Pradodesign Museum of the Second World War | Studio Architektoniczne Kwadrat

Designed by Studio Architektoniczne Kwadrat, The Museum of the Second World War is built on a lot at Władysław Bartoszewski Square near the center of the city. It is located in a symbolic architectural space, which is also a space of memory, 200 meters from the historic Polish Post Office in Gdańsk and 3 kilometers across the water from Westerplatte Peninsula, both of which were attacked in September 1939.

Photography: Pawel Paniczko

The 1,700-square-metre lot set aside for the museum touches the Radunia Canal to the west, while its south side opens onto a wide panorama of the Motława River. Today, these are the outskirts of Old Gdańskbut, soon, it will be the core of the modern section of the city that will replace its shipyard.
Jurors of the competition for the museum’s architectural plan have described it as “a new symbol of Gdańsk”, “a new icon” and a “sculptural design”. Daniel Libeskind, the jury’s chairman and one of the world’s best-known architects, designer of the Jewish Museum Berlin, justified the selection of the project as “Using the language of architecture, the selected project narrates the tragedy of the past, the vitality of the present, and opens the horizons of the future. The rising, dynamic form symbolizes the museum below while giving a panoramic and spectacular orientation to the historic city and its future. Echoing the iconic skyline of Gdańsk, with its shipyard cranes and church towers, the building ties together traditional urban spaces, scales, materials, and colors of the city with a 21st-century museum”.

Photography: Pawel Paniczko

Its authors, Kwadrat studio, have called their project a silent design, intended to evoke powerful emotions and deep reflection. The museum’s spatial division into three areas symbolizes the relationships between the wartime past, the present, and the future: the past is hidden on the building’s underground levels, the present appears in the open space around the building and the future is expressed by its rising protrusion, which includes a viewing platform.
The building has about 23,000 square meters of floor area, of which the space reserved for the permanent exhibition covers around 5,000 square meters. The exhibition uses the most modern methods to present the Second World War from the perspective of big-power politics but, primarily, through the fates of ordinary people. It is not limited to the experiences of Poles, but recount those of other nations. Apart from the main exhibition space, 1,000 square meters are devoted to temporary shows. The museum’s mission is also to serve as a center of education, culture, and research.

Photography: Pawel Paniczko

“Entering the Museum of The World War II competition in Gdansk we were fully aware of the problems that may occur during the design process as well as its interaction with the environment and very complicated functionality.
To fit in the historic part of the city, and creating a form that may become its icon at the same time, we had to make a compromise between its form and monumentality, being careful with its impudence and aggressiveness. We wanted the architecture to be a delicate suggestion rather than strong quotation for the World War II tragedy. That is how the idea of dynamic, expressive form had been brought to live, tearing apart the symbolic and dramatic shell covering the world, created by the war. The design of the form is to be undefined by one literal meaning. It may be discovered in many ways by each and every individual viewer.

Photography: Pawel Paniczko

Following the design process, we have agreed to leave most of the site as an open public space, so we moved some part of an exhibition underground. Entering the subterranean levels is to be a mood-setting process. Starting from being unconcern and full of everyday thoughts, to be hanged in the balance and clear-minded, to finally fell the horror, frightens and even pain by a strong relationship with the exhibition. The underground part of the museum is a path through a hell of war, a time travel experience. The “back to reality” begins with the ground level and the public space surrounding the museum, the place to think, to gather the experience from the underground. But that’s not the end, the past is a creator of the future, so as the viewer climbs the tower to the very top, he sees hope and freedom, he sees an old and young town of Gdansk. He sees it having thoughts of the past he had just experienced.”

Plan -9.25

Project Info:
Architects: Studio Architektoniczne Kwadrat
Location: Plac Władysława Bartoszewskiego 1, 80-862 Gdańsk, Poland
Architects in Charge: Jacek Droszcz, Bazyli Domsta, Andrzej Kwieciński, Zbigniew Kowalewski
Area: 57386.0 m2
Project Year: 2017
Photographs: Pawel Paniczko
Manufacturers: Saint Gobain, Peri
Project Name: Museum of the Second World War

The post Museum of the Second World War | Studio Architektoniczne Kwadrat appeared first on Arch2O.com.

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Luminous Drapes | Studio Toggle Luminous Drapes, Studio Toggle was invited by Nuqat, a nonprofit organization based in Kuwait to create an outdoor space for their cultural forum “The Human Capital 2018”. The location given was the outdoor plaza of the newly opened Sheikh Jaber Al-Ahmad Cultural Centre in Kuwait City. The design of the pavilion stemmed from a desire to create a lightweight, soft and malleable space habitable in novel ways. The pavilion is meant to be colonized based on the activities that it will accommodate. These activities were analyzed and broken down into its anthropometric parameters. Photography: Gijo Paul George These parameters then informed the various taxonomies of voids that catered to the programmed activities and were mapped on to a modular grid. A low-tech, cost-efficient, incremental, modular system was developed using re-usable construction scaffolding and laser-cut IKEA drapes. The voids created by the subtractive operations on the stacked drapes are taxonomized into activity facilitators and occupied as such. A modular grid 3x3M grid is made from construction scaffolding and IKEA drapes are cut and arranged in a pattern derived from a parametric algorithm. The differences in height and width result in people reacting to the spaces in different ways and colonizing it intuitively. Modular Fabrication Diagram During the night, the lit pavilion changes its ambiance and makes for a dynamic space. Light is used as a sculptural medium to elevate the perception of both the grid and space. It frames and defines the way the users engage with the pavilion. The pavilion represents an up-cycled habitat generated from a utilitarian and modular grid system. Photography: Gijo Paul George Project Info: Architects: Studio Toggle Location: Kuwait City, Kuwait Lead Architects: Gijo Paul George, Hend Almatrouk, Hessa Al Thuwaikh, Lulwa Al Obaid Area: 200.0 m2 Project Year: 2018 Photographs: Gijo Paul George Manufacturers: Ikea, Kirby Project Name: Luminous Drapes The post Luminous Drapes | Studio Toggle appeared first on Arch2O.com. http://bit.ly/2V0m5iM

February 16, 2019

from Pradodesign Luminous Drapes | Studio Toggle

Luminous Drapes, Studio Toggle was invited by Nuqat, a nonprofit organization based in Kuwait to create an outdoor space for their cultural forum “The Human Capital 2018”. The location given was the outdoor plaza of the newly opened Sheikh Jaber Al-Ahmad Cultural Centre in Kuwait City. The design of the pavilion stemmed from a desire to create a lightweight, soft and malleable space habitable in novel ways. The pavilion is meant to be colonized based on the activities that it will accommodate. These activities were analyzed and broken down into its anthropometric parameters.

Photography: Gijo Paul George

These parameters then informed the various taxonomies of voids that catered to the programmed activities and were mapped on to a modular grid. A low-tech, cost-efficient, incremental, modular system was developed using re-usable construction scaffolding and laser-cut IKEA drapes. The voids created by the subtractive operations on the stacked drapes are taxonomized into activity facilitators and occupied as such. A modular grid 3x3M grid is made from construction scaffolding and IKEA drapes are cut and arranged in a pattern derived from a parametric algorithm. The differences in height and width result in people reacting to the spaces in different ways and colonizing it intuitively.

Modular Fabrication Diagram

During the night, the lit pavilion changes its ambiance and makes for a dynamic space. Light is used as a sculptural medium to elevate the perception of both the grid and space. It frames and defines the way the users engage with the pavilion. The pavilion represents an up-cycled habitat generated from a utilitarian and modular grid system.

Photography: Gijo Paul George

Project Info:
Architects: Studio Toggle
Location: Kuwait City, Kuwait
Lead Architects: Gijo Paul George, Hend Almatrouk, Hessa Al Thuwaikh, Lulwa Al Obaid
Area: 200.0 m2
Project Year: 2018
Photographs: Gijo Paul George
Manufacturers: Ikea, Kirby
Project Name: Luminous Drapes

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